Carnegie

Fall 2021

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GUIDES Cookware Types • Curved side walls for easy stirring and sliding food out of the pan • Ideal for frying, scrambling, sautéing or searing • Sloped sides prevent steam from forming in the pan Fry Pan • Wide bottom area for maximum heat conduction • Ideal for sautéing, searing, deglazing, poaching, and stir frying • Straight, high sides help contain food and expose all sides to heat Sauté Pan • Ideal for stir frying or wok applications • Deep curved sides promote excellent food movement • Flat bottom sits level on cooking surface Stir Fry Pan • Hybrid sauce pan and fry pan • Sauté, brown, poach, create a stir-fry and build a sauce • Curved sides allow for thorough and efficient whisking of ingredients Saucier • Wide bottom area for maximum heat conduction • Ideal for creating and reducing sauces and cooking vegetables • Use with a lid to control evaporation and accelerate cooking Straight Sided Sauce Pan • Small bottom diameter for less heat exposure • Flared sides allows for good stirring action • Ideal for cooking at lower temperatures for a longer time Tapered Sauce Pan • Wide heating surface allows the cooking of meats and vegetables in limited amounts of liquid • Ideal for long, slow cooking which allows the liquid to add juices and flavor • Also used as a hot bath in conjunction with tapered sauce pans for melting butters, heating sauces or blanching vegetables Brazier/Rondo • Wide bottom area for maximum heat conduction • Ideal for slow cooking stews, sauces, soups, casseroles and roasts while reducing the content • Two loop handles for easier pouring and movement Sauce Pot • Wide flat bottom for maximum cooking area • Designed to heat or brown foods • Ideal for eggs, grilled cheese, quesadillas, sandwiches Griddle • Thick base for a good slow simmer • Ideal for stocks, soups, pastas, bulk vegetables and seafood • Smaller diameter and taller height of pot preserves liquids longer and forces the liquid to bubble up through the ingredients, maximizing flavor transfer Stock Pot

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